The data, provided by the office of Climate Research Division at the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Pune, shows that most of these stations are located along the west coast, northeast and north India regions.

This August is turning out to be one of the wettest months during monsoon since 2015, as 1,204 meteorological stations have recorded rainfall of more than 11.5 cm and another 272 meteorological stations have recorded over 20.4 cm, both for a period of 24 hours, in this month.

The data, provided by the office of Climate Research Division at the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Pune, shows that most of these stations are located along the west coast, northeast and north India regions.

The heavy downpour that started at the beginning of August over Kerala, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Gujarat led to severe flooding and triggered landslides. After that, monsoon activity shifted north and led to extremely heavy spells over Rajasthan, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand last weekend.

West Bengal, Odisha and Madhya Pradesh also experienced heavy rain last week, with the monsoon drenching close to 80 per cent of India’s land cover.

Though IMD maintains a very dense network of more than 9,000 meteorological stations all over India, the present figures are from the real-time rainfall data generated from close to 3,500 stations.

However, meteorologists are still to investigate the possible reasons for such unprecedented rainfall over such a vast landmass.

“We need to study in-depth and understand these heavy rainfall events. Though the ongoing monsoon pulse in the last two days has been very weak, the rainfall amounts recorded have remained above normal. We can’t attribute reasons to any one phenomenon that could have caused such heavy spells. This simply suggests how complex the monsoon system is,” AK Srivastava, head of the Climate Research Division, told The Indian Express.

However, weather scientists confirmed that many of these downpours were triggered due to convective activity, locally. “Many studies have indicated a rise in extreme rainfall events globally, and the rainfall during this monsoon season over India has been unusually high,” added Srivastava.
During August, there were days when some states like Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Kerala and Karnataka, along with some areas in West Bengal, Madhya Pradesh and Odisha, recorded surplus rainfall amounting up to 1,000 per cent than normal (daily).

Similarly, data suggests that July also saw some heavy spells, with 914 stations recording more than 11.5 cm in 24 hours. It also suggests that July saw the highest number of meteorological stations reporting such heavy rainfall.

The All India rainfall (as on August 20) suggests that the country has recorded 30.8 per cent surplus rainfall in August alone. Of this, rainfall over South Peninsula is surplus by 78.3 per cent, followed by central India (57 per cent), northwest India (9.4 per cent).

The country’s rainfall for the overall season, till August 20, is 2 per cent above normal.

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